Free Plans to Build a Brooklyn Chair

An Easy to Build Chair with Tapered Legs Suitable for All Skill Levels! – Updated 10/3/19

I really like the design of this chair and especially the fact that it is an easy build! The design of the free plans to build a Brooklyn chair, and the subsequent next two pieces (here and here) in the collection, are also suitable for indoor use!

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Copy

As a side note, the front legs are not tapered and the back legs are which gives this piece tons of character, and I have updated the plan to make the rear legs in one piece.

Materials:

Lumber:

  • 1 – 1×3 at 6′
  • 1 – 1×4 at 6′
  • 2 – 2×2 at 8′
  • 1 – 2′ x 2′ sheet of 3/4″ plywood

Cut List:

  • 2 – 2×4 at 40″ – Legs
  • 4 – 1×4 at 17″ – Back Slats
  • 2 – 1×3 at 17″ – Back & Front Stretchers
  • 2 – 2×2 at 17-1/4″ – Front Legs
  • 2 – 1×3 at 17-1/2″ – Side Stretchers
  • 1 – 3/4″ plywood at 20″ x 20-1/2″ – Seat

free plans to build a brooklyn chair

Click on the drawings for a larger view!

Step One

Cut the pieces for the back legs. Draw a line on the 2x4s 18″ up from the bottom, then draw a line 3-1/4″ below that.  make a mark at 13/16″ from one edge of each of these lines (this is the FRONT of the leg), and 9/16″ from the opposite edge (this will be the BACK of the leg). On the bottom edge of the board, make a mark 3/4″ in from the back edge. Draw a diagonal line at the mark above at the front edge (on the lower line) to the mark at the lower edge. Draw another diagonal line from the mark at 9/16″ to the lower corner of the board. This will create the taper on the lower end of the legs.

Make a mark 3/4″ from the top end of the back edge of the leg. Draw a diagonal line from the 13/16″ mark on the upper line at the middle of the leg to this mark. Draw another diagonal line from the 9/16″ mark on the upper line to the top edge of the board to form the taper for the top of the leg.

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_legs 1

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_legs 2

 

 

Step Two

Cut the pieces for the back slats and the back stretcher. Drill pocket holes in each end. Position the stretcher as shown then secure using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws. Secure the back slats along the angle of the upper back, with 1″ spacing between them, using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Back

Step Three

Cut the pieces for the front legs and the front stretcher. Drill holes in each end of the stretcher. Position as shown then secure to the legs using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Front Frame

Step Four

Cut the pieces for the side stretchers and drill pocket holes in each end. Position as shown then secure to the legs using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws in the front and 2″ pocket hole screws in the back legs.

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Stretchers

Step Five

Cut the piece for the seat and cut the notches using a jigsaw or a bandsaw. Apply edge banding, if desired. Attach to the seat frame using glue and 1-1/4″ brad nails.

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Seat 1

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Seat 2

Finish as desired!

This chair is part of a really neat collection that can be finished in a variety of ways. The entire collection is easy to construct, and very inexpensive! Have questions about the free plans to build a Brooklyn chair? Leave a comment below!

Originally posted 2013-06-11 08:00:01.

5 Comments

  • […] I posted plans for the Brooklyn chair. Today’s plan is for the second piece in the collection – the Brooklyn bar stool. […]

  • […] is the final piece in the Brooklyn collection. We started with the Brooklyn chair and then the Brooklyn bar stool. This table is easy to customize so that either the chairs or bar […]

  • Thad Niles says:

    Just one quick comment for the reference of readers. Joining the back posts with glue and screws as you’ve done on several chair plans is not preferred, because it is not a very strong and reliable joint. Ideally, you would cut it in a single piece, or if you have to, create as long of a scarf joint as you can to maximize the gluing surface, side grain to side grain. Your version is entirely held together by screws–the end grain to end grain glue joint provides very little strength. These chairs should never be sold, or even given away to strangers–if one breaks, you can be held liable for injuries (the crazy world we live in). With all that said, I do like these plans as an exercise. Thank you for putting in the time to create these!

  • captain says:

    Agreeing with Thad, I make this ‘type’ of chairs frequently with different designs and ALL joints are mortised.
    I do not use any fasteners only glue/clamps and a good grade glue or epoxy. The reason I do not use fasteners is occasionally years later, after some people continually lean back on the chairs some of the joints may come lose and it is easier to disassemble the char to repair it if there is no fasteners. While the pocket screws could be used with the tenon joints, these fasteners are unsightly. I also use “corner blocks at each leg corner with lag screws to further tighten and secure the joints which add much stability and life to the chair especially in the cases of abuse.

    I also use “good wood” for the seat and fasten to the frame with screws and plug the holes which also further strengthen the chair overall. This along with fabricated edge molding.
    All of my work in all areas is clear finished with stain and varnish to enhance the wood grain..

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