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Build a Brooklyn Chair


Free Plans to Build a Brooklyn Chair

With warm weather in full swing, I’ve got a few more plans for outdoor furniture! I really like the design of this chair and especially the fact that it is an easy build! The design of the free plans to build a Brooklyn chair, and the subsequent next two pieces (here and here) in the collection, are also suitable for indoor use!

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Copy

As a side note, the front legs are not tapered and the back legs are which gives this piece tons of character!

Materials:

  • 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws
  • 2″ pocket hole screws
  • 2-1/2″ pocket hole screws
  • 1-1/4″ brad nails
  • Edge banding
  • Finishing supplies

Lumber:

  • 1 – 1×3 at 6′
  • 1 – 1×4 at 6′
  • 2 – 2×2 at 8′
  • 1 – 2′ x 2′ sheet of 3/4″ plywood

Cut List:

  • 2 – 2×2 at 18″ – Lower Back Legs
  • 2 – 2×2 at 22″ – Upper Back Legs
  • 4 – 1×4 at 17″ – Back Slats
  • 2 – 1×3 at 17″ – Back & Front Stretchers
  • 2 – 2×2 at 17-1/4″ – Front Legs
  • 2 – 1×3 at 17-1/2″ – Side Stretchers
  • 1 – 3/4″ plywood at 20″ x 20-1/2″ – Seat

free plans to build a brooklyn chair

Click on the drawings for a larger view!

Step One

Cut the pieces for the back legs. Cut the tapers as shown using a jigsaw or a tapering jig on the tablesaw. Drill pocket holes in the top edge of the lower back legs noting that there will be a left and a right, and the straight edge will face out. Cut a 3 degree bevel in the lower edge of the upper back legs. The straight edge of the upper back will face out, also! Assemble the legs using glue and 2-1/2″ pocket hole screws.

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Back Legs 1free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Back Legs 2

Step Two

Cut the pieces for the back slats and the back stretcher. Drill pocket holes in each end. Position the stretcher as shown then secure using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws. Secure the back slats along the angle of the upper back, with 1″ spacing between them, using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Back

Step Three

Cut the pieces for the front legs and the front stretcher. Drill holes in each end of the stretcher. Position as shown then secure to the legs using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Front Frame

Step Four

Cut the pieces for the side stretchers and drill pocket holes in each end. Position as shown then secure to the legs using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws in the front and 2″ pocket hole screws in the back legs.

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Stretchers

Step Five

Cut the piece for the seat and cut the notches using a jigsaw or a bandsaw. Apply edge banding, if desired. Attach to the seat frame using glue and 1-1/4″ brad nails.

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Seat 1

free plans to build a brooklyn chair_Seat 2

Finish as desired!

The free plans to build a Brooklyn chair are part of a really neat collection that can be finished in a variety of ways. The entire collection is easy to construct, and very inexpensive! Got a project you’ve completed using my plans? Share photos with me at cher {at} designsbystudioc {dot} com or designsbystudioc {at} gmail {dot} com. I would love to feature your work on DbSC!

#DIY #Build #Woodworking

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  • Thad Niles

    Just one quick comment for the reference of readers. Joining the back posts with glue and screws as you’ve done on several chair plans is not preferred, because it is not a very strong and reliable joint. Ideally, you would cut it in a single piece, or if you have to, create as long of a scarf joint as you can to maximize the gluing surface, side grain to side grain. Your version is entirely held together by screws–the end grain to end grain glue joint provides very little strength. These chairs should never be sold, or even given away to strangers–if one breaks, you can be held liable for injuries (the crazy world we live in). With all that said, I do like these plans as an exercise. Thank you for putting in the time to create these!

    • CherTexter

      Hi, Thad! Thank you for taking the time to comment. I appreciate your opinion!

  • captain

    Agreeing with Thad, I make this ‘type’ of chairs frequently with different designs and ALL joints are mortised.
    I do not use any fasteners only glue/clamps and a good grade glue or epoxy. The reason I do not use fasteners is occasionally years later, after some people continually lean back on the chairs some of the joints may come lose and it is easier to disassemble the char to repair it if there is no fasteners. While the pocket screws could be used with the tenon joints, these fasteners are unsightly. I also use “corner blocks at each leg corner with lag screws to further tighten and secure the joints which add much stability and life to the chair especially in the cases of abuse.

    I also use “good wood” for the seat and fasten to the frame with screws and plug the holes which also further strengthen the chair overall. This along with fabricated edge molding.
    All of my work in all areas is clear finished with stain and varnish to enhance the wood grain..

Designs by Studio C is your DIY connection to How-To information, DIY projects and free furniture plans. Have questions about the plans? Contact me at cher@designsbystudioc.com!
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