Rest Your Feet on this Easy to Make Piece

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool

When I saw this wooden spool by the trash (that formerly held wire sold by the foot), I knew exactly what I wanted to make with it… The DIY ottoman or footstool is made using an old wooden spool with upholstery fabric, batting, foam and casters. This easy to make piece requires minimal sewing skills (basically sewing a straight line), an upholstery stapler and a drill…

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Featured

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Underside

Materials:

  • Old wooden spool
  • Scissors
  • 1″ foam (I used a piece of a memory foam mattress topper)
  • Upholstery batting
  • Decorative upholstery fabric
  • 1/4″ filler cord or decorator piping
  • Iron-on hem tape
  • Upholstery stapler with staples
  • Cardboard tack strip
  • 2″ casters and 3/4″ screws

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Spool Before

Step One

Take a few measurements of the spool… This will be really helpful in determining how much fabric, batting and foam are needed, as well as how long the skirt will be. The spool I used measured 19″ across, 13″ tall and was 62″ in circumference.

I cut a piece of fabric measuring 36″ long by the width of the fabric. (Most upholstery or decorator fabrics are approximately 52″ wide.) I laid the fabric on a table, right side facing down, then laid the batting on top of it. I traced the top of the spool on the foam, then cut out the circle.

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Fabric Layers

Step Two

Secure the fabric and batting to the underside of the top of the spool using the stapler and the staples. Pull the fabric as tightly and as smoothly as possible while stapling. The staples should be positioned so they are close together. This helps keep the fabric taut so it will not pull out. Trim the excess fabric and batting away.

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Securing Fabric

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Trimmed Fabric

Step Three

Decorative welting will be applied to the sides of the top. I made my own welting with a strip of the fabric (cut at 2″ wide) and 1/4″ cotton filler cord. Welting can also be purchased at any fabric or hobby store. Position the welting on the sides of the top so that the underside of the cording is flush with the top of the side – staple in place.

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Securing Welting

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Welting Completed

Step Four

Position the casters on the bottom of the spool and secure in place with the 3/4″ screws.

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Casters

Step Five

The length of the skirt will be determined by the height of the spool plus 2″ for the hem, 2″ to cover the casters and 3/4″ for the top “seam”. I cut four pieces of fabric at 17-3/4″ by the width of the fabric because I wanted to add 2″ box pleats all the way around. I sewed the pieces of fabric together, end to end, then pressed a 2″ hem in the bottom. I used the iron-on hem tape (because I was too lazy to sew the hem) to hold the hem in place. I started pressing the box pleats in place along the length of the fabric. I pinned the top to hold it in place until I could sew the pleats down. I continued with the pleats until the piece measured the circumference of the top piece of the spool. Stitch a 3/4″ sam along the top of the pleats, then sew the ends together.

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Hem

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Pleats

Step Six

The skirt will be attached to the top piece of the spool by using a cardboard tack strip on top of the “seam” portion of the skirt (at the top of the pleats). Position the skirt on the top piece of the spool with the stitched seam just below the corded portion of the welting – the skirt will have the wrong side facing to the outside and the skirt itself will be upside down. Place a piece of the cardboard tack strip on top of the skirt piece and staple in place. The tack strip, when placed directly under the cord piece of the welting, will create a crisp edge when the skirt is turned right side out.

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Securing Skirt

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Completed Outside

DIY Ottoman or Footstool Using an Old Wooden Spool_Completed Inside

Can’t find an old wooden spool to use for this awesome ottoman/footstool? Stay tuned because I will share plans on how to make one of your very own that is cheap and easy! Have questions about the DIY ottoman or footstool using an old wooden spool? Leave a comment below!




Reupholstering a Chair and Creating a New Seat

How to Use Elasbelt for Seats in Upholstery Projects

A few years ago, I built this chair for The Design Confidential and I upholstered it. This is the chair I use at my desk any time I am on the computer. Because this chair is built with a plywood seat, it becomes horribly uncomfortable after a few hours of sitting on it. I discovered an upholstery webbing called Elasbelt that takes the place of springs in seats and decided to give it a try. I created a video on how to use Elasbelt for seats in upholstery projects to share how easy it is to create a comfortable seat in upholstered chairs!

How to Use Elasbelt for Seats in Upholstery Projects_Rolls

Elasbelt is an upholstery webbing with stretch that takes the place of springs. It comes to two different types – with a red stripe for seats and a green stripe for backs. It is sort of stiff and really hard stretch by hand. A pair of webbing pliers are a must when using this product! The Elasbelt is stapled to the frame of the chair on one side then stretched and stapled to the other side. Take a look at the video:

http://youtu.be/uBiPun-30V8

The seats of any of the chair plans on DbSC can be adapted to use Elasbelt. A 1×2 frame can be nailed to the top of the front legs, and side and back aprons to give a foundation for the Elasbelt. Note that the seat will have to be upholstered in order to cover the Elasbelt but it is super easy to do and I can be contacted at any time for help!

How to Use Elasbelt for Seats in Upholstery Projects_Finished

I am also planning on changing the seat of the Carlsbad chair to make it more comfortable. This will require disassembling my chair but I think it will be worth it in the long run – I love that chair!

Have any questions on how to use Elasbelt for seats in upholstery projects? Leave a comment below or email me at cher {at} designsbystudioc {dot} com!




Upholstering the Ballard Designs Inspired X-Bench

Here is another “collaboration” with The Design Confidential. This time, it is for the Ballard Designs Inspired X-Bench!

 

Materials:

  • Completed bench from these plans
  • 3″ foam
  • Spray adhesive
  • Upholstery batting
  • Fabric
  • Staple gun

 

Let’s Get Started!

I’m trying to use supplies I already have at home which will reduce my “collection” and save more money for more projects… Rather than buy more foam for the seat, I used two narrower pieces, the same thickness, and joined them with duct tape. I then cut it to size using a bread knife and used spray adhesive to attach it to the plywood seat.

  

Cover the foam with upholstery batting and staple the batting to the underside of the plywood seat.

I wanted to use regular cotton fabric so I used a piece of muslin underneath to help beef up the fabric.

Then, I started folding the fabric over (making a small “hem” so the raw edges were not exposed) and stapled the fabric to the underside of the seat. I like to put one staple in the middle and one at each end, then fill in between.

   

Pull the fabric as tight as possible and repeat for the other side.

Repeat the process again for the other two ends only this time making “hospital corners” when folding the ends of the fabric in and trimming away any bulk as necessary. Staple in place.

       

I then added a couple of stitches with a needle and thread at each corner to secure the fabric.

    

Attach the leg assembly with screws through the upper stretchers into the seat. I primed, then painted the frame with Martha Stewart Living in Mushroom (eggshell finish).

 

Yay! Another awesome collaboration with The Design Confidential. Thanks, Rayan, for the opportunity!

Until next time,

Happy Creating!

 

 

 




Upholstering the PB Teen Inspired Suite Chair

Here is another upholstery “collaboration” with The Design Confidential, this time upholstering the Pottery Barn Teen Inspired Suite Chair. I had a little help from The Han with this one, especially since this chair is for her room. We are transitioning into a “teen” room to reflect her style!

The fabrics we chose for this chair are by Premier Prints – Menagerie and Polka. The paint is Martha Stewart Living in Mushroom, eggshell low-lustre finish (a $5.00 score from the mistake rack – yay!)

There are several options for covering the back of the chair… One fabric could be used throughout, or wallpaper, or scrapbooking paper, etc. The Sunday Comics would be awesome, too! These chairs would be a great addition to a home office, family room, or in a teen’s room like mine!

Materials:

      • Plans and lumber for the chair (go here for the plans)
      • 2 yds. drapery or upholstery fabric
      • 4″ foam for seat
      • 2″ foam for back
      • Upholstery batting
      • Spray adhesive
      • Staple gun
      • Fancy trim
      • Hot glue gun, or Fabri-Tac

Let’s get started!

The chair should be almost completely constructed to this point with the exception of the back. (I took the picture before I had the seat on!)

Prime and paint, or stain as desired. (Yes, occasionally I “create” in my PJs!)

Cut a piece of 4″ foam for the seat. Spray the seat with adhesive and position in place. I was trying to use up scraps of foam I have been accumulating so I used duct tape to piece them together. Cut upholstery batting to fit over the top and sides of the foam.

   

Cut a square from the fabric for the seat top. I cut mine at 33″ x 33″ which allowed for the sides, as well as a 1/2″ hem. To make the corners, line up the edges to form a triangle. Draw a line perpendicular to the edges that measures 4-1/2″ from the edge to the fold. Repeat for each corner and sew a seam on the line. Trim the excess away.

    

Press under 1/2″ to form a hem and place the cover on the seat. If you are using a directional print, make sure the design is facing the correct way!

  

It may look as if the piece is too small but it isn’t. The seat cover needs to fit as tightly as possible so the foam and batting do not shift. Begin by stapling the side through the hem into the plywood seat. Staple the corners first, then the center. Continue to fill in across the entire edge with staples. They don’t have to be perfectly straight because they will be covered with trim later.

    

I had to get a little creative in order to pull the other side over and staple it. (I didn’t have any extra helpers around!) I used clamps to squash the foam to make it easier to pull and staple!

Continue this process for the front and the back, using the clamps to help as necessary!

Glue the trim over the staples on the seat and let dry.

Cut a piece of fabric to cover the exposed wood on the back. Using spray adhesive, adhere the fabric to the plywood. Smooth out any bubbles or wrinkles.

   

Create the fabric cover for the back using the same steps as the seat. The back doesn’t have to be nearly as tight as the seat. Staple the bottom of the back fabric cover on the plywood for the back and glue on the trim before the back is attached to the chair. Then use a brad nailer to attach the back to the chair frame.

    

Cut a piece of foam and upholstery batting for the back and secure in the same manner as the seat using the spray adhesive. Pull the cover over and secure to the top of the back plywood piece with staples. Secure the sides of the fabric with staples, as well.

  

 Once the back cover has been stapled in place, glue the remaining trim over the staples on all sides. What an awesome chair!!

   

 

Until next time,

Happy Creating!

 




Adding Upholstery to a Newly Built Wood Chair

 Upholstering the RH Inspired Baroque Chair…

Here is another plan I drew for The Design Confidential that I was planning on building…  (That seems to get me in a lot of trouble!) Although this chair doesn’t have the turned legs like the inspiration piece, I like this one a lot better. It is a little more simple and a lot more inexpensive!

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair DSCN0145 copy

Upholstery work is not an exact science… I am terrible at folding the corners and making them smooth! The trick is to pull the fabric as tight as possible (with a helper!) and secure it in place.

Once again, I used mostly scrap pieces to build this chair – I ripped 1x6s down for the aprons (and saved the slim piece left over for a paint stir-stick) and ripped pieces of 2x4s down to 2x2s for some of the other pieces. In fact, the legs are constructed from a 2×6 ripped down to 2×2. I find this is way more economical as the 2×6 cost less than $5.00 and I was able to get three 2x2s out of it!

Anyway, today I’m going to share instructions on how to upholster this chair.

Materials:

  • 1″ Foam
  • 3″ Foam
  • Upholstery Batting
  • Fabric of your choice (about 1-1/2 yds.)
  • Scissors & Pins
  • Sewing Machine
  • Staple Gun
  • Braided Trim (3 yds.)

The chair will need to be constructed to this point. The design plans can be found here .

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0786

Only the parts that are going to show will need to be painted or stained  – the legs, and part of the back legs. Apply polyurethane on these areas also and let it completely dry.

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0793

I chose a cotton and linen blend fabric for the chair. The color is similar to the color copper changes to when exposed to the elements – a “Verdegris” color!

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0823

Cut a piece of the fabric to fit inside the back. Use spray adhesive to secure the fabric in place and smooth out any wrinkles. another option would be to use decorative wallpaper or scrapbooking paper on the back – how cute would that be??

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0824

Cut the foam for the back. Use the spray adhesive and adhere the foam to the front…

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0826

Layer the upholstery batting and fabric on the foam. Cut a notch at each side of the bottom to allow for the legs. Start with the center bottom – pull it tight and staple on the inside of the back.  I like to use a staple in the center and one in each end, then I fill in between them. Fold in any raw edges and secure with a few staples. (Don’t worry – these staples will be covered later with decorative trim.)

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0831

Smooth the fabric up the front and over the top. Fold the fabric over and staple on the underside of the back in the same manner as the bottom.

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0832

Fold in the raw edges at the notch of the sides and fasten the sides to the legs in the same manner as the top and bottom.

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0834

A view from the front…

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0835

 I used three pieces of 1″ foam for the seat (its what I had on hand). Cut notches in the back of the foam for the seat to allow for the legs. Spray the seat of the chair with adhesive and put the seat foam in place. Lay a piece of upholstery batting on top and cut the excess at the front corners so the batting lays flat. Pull it as tight as possible without tearing and staple in place.

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair DSCN0143

Cut the fabric for the seat. It needs to be large enough to fold over the aprons and staple on the underside. The front of the seat upholstery will have two vertical seams at the corners to make a sort of box. Cut notches in the back of the upholstery batting and fabric also to allow for the legs.  Start at the front apron, fold the raw edge of the fabric under, and staple the layers to the underside at the center and each end. Fill in the staples along that line.

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair DSCN0144

Smooth the fabric over the seat, turn under any raw edges and pull it as tight as possible – an extra set of hands may be needed! Start stapling the back between the legs on the underside of the aprons. Do the same for the sides. At the back legs where the fabric ends, turn the fabric under the batting to hide the raw edges. An upholstery nail can be used here to secure the fabric if desired.

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0833

Cover the exposed staples on the back with decorative trim.

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0859

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair SANY0858Done, yahoo!! Now onto the next chair…

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair DSCN0145

upholstering the RH inspired baroque chair DSCN0146

 So what do you think? Are you going to tackle this chair plan and try your hand at upholstering the RH Inspired Baroque Chair? It is an easy and inexpensive project! If you have any questions, let me know at cher {at} designsbystudioc {dot} com!