Power Tool Challenge – One Board Project

Build a DIY Wood Letter Jewelry Hanger

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It is time once again for the monthly Power Tool Challenge with this month’s theme being a “one board” project… For my project, I chose to build a DIY wood letter jewelry hanger with a 1×4 board. This board isn’t exactly a standard length such as 6′ or 8′ – it is a board I found in the cull bin at The Home Depot that is only 5′ long (I got a super deal on it!).

Build a DIY Wood Letter Jewelry Hanger

This jewelry hanger is for my daughter, Hannah (or normally known as “The Han”), and matches her style perfectly! My oldest is moving out of the house and Han – excuse me, The Han – gets to do what most other younger siblings look forward to doing… She gets to move into her big brother’s old room. Over the next several weeks, we have plenty of awesome projects planned for her new space!

Build a DIY Wood Letter Jewelry Hanger - with Jewelry

As for this project, it is one of the easiest to make and the concept can be adapted to other letters. The trim around the letters has a 1/4″ profile over the base letter with mitered corners. I secured the trim using a fast-drying wood adhesive, such as DAP® Rapid Fuse Wood Adhesive, in lieu of nails or screws.

I started by cutting two pieces of the 1×4 at 12″ and one piece at 3-1/2″ long. I drilled pocket holes in the 3-1/2″ piece, staggering the holes so they wouldn’t interfere with each other. I centered the shorter piece on the longer 12″ pieces and secured them using 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

Build a DIY Wood Letter Jewelry Hanger - Pieces for Letter

I ripped the remaining piece of the board on the table saw into 1″ strips. (Always use common-sense safety practices when using power tools. Be aware and not distracted when cutting boards close to the blade.) I thoroughly sanded all of the pieces prior to cutting.

I cut a 45° miter in one end of the 1″ pieces and started measuring for the trim. I cut the pieces for the outside first, then worked my way around securing the trim pieces with wood adhesive.

Build a DIY Wood Letter Jewelry Hanger - Mitered Trim

For the finish, I applied a coat of stain in Kona, followed by a coat of stain in Sunbleached, then finished with two coats of Triple Thick Polyurethane, all by Varathane.

Build a DIY Wood Letter Jewelry Hanger - Stain

I added a pair of antique brass cup hooks to one “leg” of the letter for hanging necklaces, and another pair of cup hooks with a pair of jewelry box pulls on the other “leg”. I also added two keyhole hangers with screws to the back for hanging.

Build a DIY Wood Letter Jewelry Hanger - Hangers on Back

Build a DIY Wood Letter Jewelry Hanger - Hooks and Loops

Take a look at the other awesome one board projects from my fellow blogging friends:

One board projects by the Power Tool Challenge Team

An easy to make wood letter doubling as a jewelry hanger using hooks and jewelry box pulls. Super-easy to make!

Amazing, as always! Have any questions about how to build a DIY wood letter jewelry hanger? Leave a comment below!




Power Tool Challenge – Anything Goes Edition

DIY Wall Sign with Scrappy Moulding

This post contains an affiliate link… What that means is that if the link is clicked and a purchase is made, I will receive a small commission. Thank you for supporting Designs by Studio C!

Time flies by so fast… It is already time for the Power Tool Challenge! This is a group where fellow bloggers and I make really awesome projects using simple power tools. In all honesty, I didn’t think I would make it this month because I have too many irons in the fire and thought the PTC group would post next week. Fortunately, I was able to create something really cool and simple! For this month’s challenge, I made a DIY wall sign with scrappy moulding and a reverse-stenciled quote on the front. Trust me, it doesn’t get any easier!

DSCF4413

I already had strips of 3/4″ plywood that were offcuts from the round tables I built for the breakroom at work. The strips measure 5″ x 42″ which is the perfect size for a long sign!

Previously, I shared a dresser where I repaired the damaged top and added small pieces of decorative moulding to the edges. I loved it so much, I wanted to use the same technique in other projects. I sanded the edges of the plywood, then added random strips of moulding to the edges secured with DAP® Rapid Fuse Wood Adhesive. The ends of the pieces were butted against one another. (I purchased the packages of moulding at Hobby Lobby.)

DIY Wall Sign with Scrappy Moulding - Piece with Moulding Scraps

When I got to the corners, I marked the ends for miters and cut them on the miter saw. This is really easy to do since a spacer is used and the trim pieces are actually cut with the saw blade centered on the piece instead of on the upswing. I cut a piece with a miter in one end first, dry fit it to the miter on the piece already in place, then marked and cut the remaining miter.

DIY Wall Sign with Scrappy Moulding - Marking Miters

DIY Wall Sign with Scrappy Moulding - Mitered Corners

I also sanded the areas where the trim pieces meet to knock down any high spots and make the transition from piece to piece a bit nicer.

DIY Wall Sign with Scrappy Moulding - Sanded Trim

I applied a coat of dark gray chalk paint to the front of the piece, then I added a quote cut out of vinyl on top. I painted over the entire piece with three coats of white chalk paint, then removed the vinyl lettering to let the grey words show through.

DIY Wall Sign with Scrappy Moulding - Vinyl Lettering

DIY Wall Sign with Scrappy Moulding - Reverse Stencil

I applied a coat of wax then added two sawtooth hangers to the back to hang the sign.

DIY Wall Sign with Scrappy Moulding - Sawtooth Hanger

I think the sign is very swoon-worthy! Take a look at some of the fabulous other projects from my fellow bloggers:

DIY Family Sign by My Love To Create

DIY Aiderondack FireBowl Table by Interior Frugalista

DIY Headboard Bench by Domestically Speaking

DIY Wall Sign by Designs By Studio C

Easy Bird Feeder by Virginia Sweet Pea

DIY Headboard Bench by Designed Decor

DIY Small Pet Bed by H2OBungalow

How To Use A Kreg Jig by My Repurposed Life

Power Tool Challenge Team Favorite Projects

DIY Wall Sign with Scrappy Moulding - On Shelf

DSCF4412

An easy to make wall sign with scrappy moulding on the edges and a reverse stenciled quote. This would make a fabulous gift!

This DIY wall sign with scrappy moulding would be perfect with a family name and “established date” on it for a gift or with a sweet quote on it and hung in a child’s room! Have any questions? Leave a comment below!




Power Tool Challenge – Summer Edition

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket

Once again, it is time for the Power Tool Challenge… This month’s theme is Summer! Since summer generally involves picking lots of fresh fruits and veggies from the garden, I created DIY plans to build a Vegetable Gathering Basket. This easy to build basket features a wood frame with a mesh bottom and a curved handle, and can be completed in a few hours! I’ve also included templates for the curved handle.

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Featured Image

Note that the veggies pictured are not mine (they are courtesy of the local grocery store and my weekly budget!)… We’ve had a lot of rain and my garden has yet to produce any – ahem – “produce”. Hopefully soon!

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Top View

Materials:

  • 2″ brad nails
  • 1-1/2″ screws
  • 1/2″ staples
  • 1/4″ hardware cloth
  • Wood glue
  • Sandpaper (100, 150, 220 grits)
  • Finishing supplies (primer & paint, or stain, sealer)

Tools needed:

  • Miter saw or circular saw
  • Drill
  • 1″ Paddle (or Spade) bit, or 1″ hole saw
  • Jigsaw
  • Router with small roundover bit
  • Pneumatic brad nailer with compressor
  • Metal snips
  • Heavy Duty stapler
  • Sander

Lumber:

  • 1 – 1×3 at 6′
  • Scrap of 1×6 at 16″

Cut List:

  • 2 – 1×3 at 10-1/2″ – Frame
  • 2 – 1×3 at 16″ – Frame
  • 1 – 1×6 at 16″ – Handle

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket

Click on the drawings for a larger view!

Notes about the project:

Print the templates (here and here), and tape them together at the registration marks. Cut out the template with scissors.

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Template

Step One

Cut the 1×6 piece for the handle to length. Trace the the handle template on the board. Cut out the handle using a jigsaw or a bandsaw.

Mark the center of the holes for the handle and drill the holes with the 1″ paddle bit or hole saw. I usually start drilling on one side, then flip the piece over and continue drilling from the other side. This creates a much cleaner hole with less tear-out.

Draw lines connecting the top and bottom of the holes and cut along the lines with a jigsaw.

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Handle

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Tracing Handle Tempate

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Handle Holes 1

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Handle Holes 2

Step Two

Use the router with the roundover bit to round the top of the handle (both sides of the board) as well as the inside of the handle (both sides, also).

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Router Bit

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Routed Handle Edges

Step Three

Drill a pilot hole in the top edge of the ends of the handle to attach the handle to the frame. Set the handle aside.

Step Four

Cut the pieces for the frame. Assemble the frame using glue and 2″ brad nails.

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Basket Frame

Step Five

Cut the hardware cloth 2″ larger on all sides than the bottom of the frame opening. Cut a 2″ x 2″ notch in each corner (approx. 8 squares), and fold 1″ over on each side of the mesh. Fold the mesh at 1″ again (even with the notches) to make a sort of basket. Set the basket aside.

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Mesh Basket 1

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Mesh Basket 2

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Mesh Basket 3

Step Six

Finish the handle and frame as desired. I painted the handle and frame (except for the inside) in the example using white paint and added a wood applique to each side of the handle.

Position the basket inside the frame and secure in place using 1/2″ staples. Position the handle on the frame in the center of the sides securing in place with a 1-1/2″ screw in each of the pre-drilled holes.

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Handle Screw 2

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Handle Screw 2

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Handle Attached

DIY Plans to Build a Vegetable Gathering Basket - Angled Top View

This easy to build Gathering Basket is perfect for a summer fuit and veggie harvest!

Like this project? Check out the project from my partners on the Power Tool Challenge team:

Frozen Treat Stand by My Love To Create

Red White And Blue Cornhole Game by Create And Babble

Drying Rack From Old Crib rail by The Kim Six Fix

Chair Spindle Wooden Garden Caddy by Interior Frugalista

Star Clothes Drying Rack by A Piece Of Rainbow

Farmhouse Bench Building Plans by Refresh Restyle

DIY Standing Towel Rack Tutorial by H2OBungalow

Reclaimed Wood Bookcase by Confessions of A Serial DIY’er

DIY Footstool by Virginia Sweet Pea

DIY Hose Hanger by My Repurposed Life

Power Tool Challenge Team Summer Themed Projects

Have any questions about the DIY plans to build a Vegetable Gathering Basket? Leave a comment below!




Power Tool Challenge – Porch & Patio Edition

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table

It is that time again, my friends – Power Tool Challenge time! This month’s theme is “Porch and Patio” and it couldn’t be a better topic with better timing! I have been working hard around my house which includes building deck though the deck will not be completed for at least another month. It certainly doesn’t stop me from building fabulous furniture for it! The DIY furniture plans to build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table feature a wood frame with round rungs at the bottom and a simple concrete top. I used a solid exterior stain on the table frame then added a stencil to the concrete top with exterior paint. It looks fabulous, if I say so myself!

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Featured View

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Top View

Materials:

  • 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws
  • 2-1/2″ screws
  • 1 – 50lb bag of quick setting concrete mix
  • Wood glue
  • Sandpaper (100, 150, 220 grits)
  • Finishing supplies (primer & paint, or stain, sealer)
  • Stencil & Exterior Paint

Tools Needed:

  • Miter Saw or Circular Saw
  • Drill
  • Pocket Hole Jig
  • 1″ Forstner Bit

Lumber:

  • 2 – 1″ Round Dowels at 4′ (or 4 at 3′)
  • 1 – 1×3 at 4′
  • 1 – 1×3 at 6′
  • 1 – 2×2 at 8′
  • Scrap 1x2s at approximately 24″ long – total of four

Cut List:

  • 4 – 2×2 at 17-1/4″ – Legs
  • 4 – 1×3 at 16-1/2″ – Aprons
  • 4 – 1″ dowels at 17-3/8″ – Bottom Rungs
  • 2 – 1×3 at 17-1/2″ – Top Supports

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table

Click on the drawings for a larger view!

To construct the base:

Step One

Cut the pieces for the legs. With all four legs lined up against each other, drill a 1/2″ deep hole with the 1″ Forstner bit approximately 4″ up from the bottom of each leg.

Turn two of the legs over so the adjoining face is up and the holes (just drilled with the Forstner bit) face left, then turn the remaining two legs over so that the holes face to the right. Drill another hole with the Forstner bit approximately 3″ up from the bottom of each leg on the face of the leg that is pointing up.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Legs 1 DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Legs 2

Step Two

Cut the pieces for the aprons. With the pocket hole jig set for 3/4″ material, drill pocket holes in each end of each piece. Secure one apron to one leg, positioning the apron 1/4″ back from the outside face of the leg using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws. Note the position of the holes on the leg to which the apron is secured… For example, if the face of the leg with the 4″ hole faces the inside (toward the apron) and the face of the leg with the 3″ hole is facing the same direction as the pocket holes (up), the opposite leg has to have the face with the 4″ hole facing in and the hole with the 3″ hole facing up. (See the drawing for clarity.)

Insert a dowel into the hole facing toward the apron, then position the other leg on the other side securing to the apron using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

Create a second assembly identical to this one for the opposite side of the table.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Side 1

Step Three

With one of the side assemblies laying face down (pocket holes facing up), secure the remaining aprons to each of the legs, positioning them 1/4″ back from the outside faces of the legs. Insert a dowel into each of the holes, then position the remaining leg assembly on top. Secure the aprons using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Side 2

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Side 3

Step Four

Cut the pieces for the top supports and drill pocket holes in each end. Secure the supports to two of the aprons using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Top Supports

Finish the base frame as desired. I used a waterproofing exterior stain in a color named Royal Hayden which is a sort of clay-orange color. It is the same stain I used on my picnic table.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Finished Table Base

To construct the top:

Before the concrete is mixed up, a mold for the top will have to be built. I used scrap wood at approximately 1″ thick but I think a thicker top would have been better. 1x2s measure 1-1/2″ wide and would be perfect!

Step One

Cut two 1x2s at 20-1/2″ long and two at 22″ long. Drill a pilot hole in each end of the 22″ pieces and assemble the mold using 2-1/2″ screws with no glue.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Concrete Mold

Step Two

Place the mold on top of a flat surface covered with plastic (a trash bag works well) or a piece of cardboard.

Mix the concrete according to the manufacturer’s instructions. When I mixed mine it was a bit “soupy” (too much water) and that is ok because the water will evaporate but the top will take longer to dry. I added a concrete colorant (charcoal grey) to the mixing water before I added the water to the concrete mix.

Pour the concrete into the mold spreading it with a small trowel or garden shovel. Give the mold a few taps with a rubber mallet to remove any voids or air bubbles in the concrete.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Concrete

Step Three

Let the concrete sit in the mold until most of the water has evaporated, then carefully remove the mold. I let mine sit for about two hours before I removed the mold (yours may not have to sit as long).

Let the concrete dry and cure for a couple of days.

Once the concrete has dried, the top can be stenciled as desired. I chose to use a large flower stencil with white exterior paint.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Stenciled Top

Move the base frame into position on the porch or patio, then position the concrete top so that each side hangs over approximately 1/2″.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Front View

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Forward View

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table - Angled View

I love this table – it came out way better than I expected! Want to check out the awesomeness from the others in the Power Tool Challenge?

1. Long Porch Planters by My Love To Create

2. DIY Flower Pot Plant Stand by Her Tool Belt

3. DIY Easy Swinging Bed by Domestically Speaking

4. PVC Pipe Vertical Garden by Kim Six

5. How to Build An Outdoor Serving Table by Create and Babble

6. Repurposed Window Garden Shelf by Refresh Restyle

7. Trimming Out Porch Posts by My Repurposed Life

8. Stenciled Concrete Topped Table by Designs By Studio C

9. 2 X 4 DIY Bench by Virginia Sweet Pea

10. DIY Outdoor Sofa Table Tutorial by H2OBungalow

11. Repurposed Electrical Spool Holder Table by Designed Decor

12. DIY Outside Standing Plant Hanger by Confessions of A Serial DIYer

Patio and Porch Power Tool Projects from The Power Tool Challenge Team

Have any questions about the DIY furniture plans to build a Stenciled Concrete Top Table? Leave a comment below!




Power Tool Challenge – Repurposed Edition

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood

It is that time again… This month’s theme for the Power Tool Challenge is “Repurposed”. I bought two ceramic planters that I was crazy about but needed stands for them. You see, we have cats and they love nothing more than kicking my planters off of the porch or knocking them over in my flower bed. I figured if I made stands for the pots, the cats might have to work a little harder to destroy my plants (maybe)! These DIY plant stands are made with recycled wood that I got from work and went together so easily!

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood

I found the plans for these plant stands over at Hey There, Home. Corey did a fabulous job on them and I knew they would be perfect for my pots! I constructed mine using a biscuit joiner instead of a pocket hole jig or dowels but if you are not comfortable with a biscuit joiner, follow Corey’s instructions for using a pocket hole jig and dowel pins!

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Pots

Materials:

  • #10 Biscuits
  • Wood Glue
  • Sandpaper (80 & 120 grits)
  • Spray Paint (I used Aged Bronze Metallic)

Tools Needed:

  • Miter saw, Circular saw or Jigsaw
  • Biscuit Joiner
  • Sander

I got the wood used for these plant stands from work – they are called “stickers” and are used to separate loads of lumber or other material. They are similar in size to a 2×3 but have a groove in one end for polypropylene strapping. They are heat-treated similar to pallets. Once the loads are broken down, the stickers are thrown away and I couldn’t stand to see that happen. I now have a huge stash of these under my carport (hoarders, unite!).

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Stickers

I used two stickers and started by ripping the grooved side off of the stickers on the table saw. (Please have all safety practices in place when using power tools!) The stickers are 1″ thick so I ripped one of the stickers into 1″ wide pieces. I left the other sticker at its original width – approximately 2-1/2″.

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Stickers Ripped to Size

I cut the 1″ pieces into 12″ lengths with my miter saw – 8 pieces total. I cut the remaining sticker into two 10-1/2″ pieces and four 4-1/4″ pieces.

I laid out the center X (the portion where the plants will rest) and made a mark at the center of each end of the shorter pieces, as well as marked the position of the shorter pieces on the longer pieces. I used my biscuit joiner to cut a slot in one end of the shorter pieces as well as on each face of the longer pieces at the center. For a super-easy tutorial on using a biscuit joiner, click here.

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Marking Slots

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Marking Slots Opposite Side

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Cutting Slots

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Center X Piece Top View

For the legs, I measured up 3-1/2″ from the bottom of each leg. This will mark the position of the top of the X where the pot will sit. I butted each X piece (long and short) against a corresponding leg and made a mark at the center of the X piece that carried over to the leg. I lettered each mark to make assembly easier. I cut a slot in the ends of the X pieces I just marked, as well as on each leg.

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Legs

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Slots in X Pieces and Legs

I applied glue to the slots cut on the longer X pieces and inserted biscuits. Then, I applied glue to the slots on one end of each shorter piece and assembled the center X. I used long clamps until the glue dried.

I applied glue to the slots at the ends of the X pieces and inserted a biscuit, then applied glue to the slots in the legs and assembled the planter. I used clamps to keep everything together until the glue dried. This is also a perfect opportunity to set the stands upright to make sure that all four legs make contact with the work surface.

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Clamped Stand Assembly

I filled the visible ends of the slots and any imperfections with filler and sanded once the filler dried. I used two coats of spray paint on the stands – the wood soaks up the paint like nobody’s business!

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Pots In Stands

As a side note, the stands can be made from any width of wood desired (1×2, 1×3, etc.). 3/4″ or 1″ square hardwood dowels can also be used.

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Stands Completed

DIY Plant Stands Made with Recycled Wood - Stands Close Up View

I love how the stands came out and want to give a huge shout out to Corey for the awesome idea! Hopefully, the cats won’t knock them over – the main culprit, Albie, is pictured below.

DSCF4064

Take a look at the other awesome repurposed projects from the Power Tool Challenge team:

1 Hanging Picket Pendant Light by Designed Decor

2 Garden Bench by Create and Babble

3 Bed Spindle Pedestal Bowl by H2OBungalow

4 Industrial Cart Coffee Table by Refresh Restyle

5 Mid Century Headboard Bench by My Repurposed Life

6 Framed Wall Spool Rack Upcycle by Kim Six

7 Vintage Tennis Racket Table by Virginia Sweet Pea

8 Recycled Wood Plant Stands by Designs By Studio C

9 Rustic Coffee Mug Holder by Interior Frugalista

10 Repurposed Cabinet Door String Art by Domestically Speaking

Power Tool Challenge Team Repurposed And Upcycled Power Tool Projects

So awesome! I always love the other projects from the group! Have any questions about the DIY plant stands made from recycled wood? Leave a comment below!




Power Tool Challenge – Spring Edition

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin

This month’s Power Tool Challenge theme is Spring… If it hasn’t yet “sprung” in your area, it will be shortly and with Spring comes thoughts of gardening. For us, that means a vegetable garden and I figured we’d need a place to store all of the fabulous fruits, veggies and herbs we plan on growing. The DIY furniture plans to build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin is a super-simple build featuring spindle legs, casters and mesh bottoms in each of the bins. In all honesty, this piece took longer to paint than it did to cut and assemble!

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Finished Featured Image

Graphic

Materials:

  • 1-3/4″ brad nails
  • 2″ brad nails
  • 2″ casters with sleeves
  • 8 – 2-1/2″ angle braces with 3/4″ screws
  • 1/4″ hardware cloth (galvanized mesh)
  • 1/2″ staples
  • Wood glue
  • Sandpaper (100, 150, 220 grits)
  • Finishing supplies (primer & paint, or stain, sealer)

Tools Needed:

  • Miter saw or circular saw
  • Drill
  • Pneumatic brad nailer with compressor (or battery powered nailer)
  • Metal snips to cut the hardware cloth
  • Pneumatic stapler
  • Drill bit to drill hole in legs for casters

Lumber:

  • 4 – 36″ spindles (I used treated spindles used for deck rails)
  • 1 – 1×8 at 4′
  • 1 – 1×8 at 8′

Cut List:

  • 4 – 1×8 at 11″
  • 4 – 1×8 at 18″

Step One

Cut the pieces for the bin boxes. Assemble the boxes using glue and 1-3/4″ brad nails. The longer pieces will overlap the ends of the shorter pieces.

Install the angle braces at the center of each joint on the inside. The braces help keep each of the bins square since there is no ridgid bottom.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Bins Constructed

Step Two

The spindles will be cut down to accommodate the boxes. They can be used as is, if desired, but I felt there would be too much space between the boxes. I cut 3-1/4″ off of one end of the spindles (for the top box), and 4″ off of the lower end of the spindle to allow for the casters and a space to attach the lower box.

Drill a hole in the bottom end of the spindles to accommodate the caster sleeve. See the manufacturer’s instructions for bit size and depth of the hole.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Spindle Legs

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Holes in Ends of Legs

Step Three

Secure two of the legs to one of the boxes (with the top edges flush) using glue and 2″ brad nails through the spindle into the end of the longer pieces of the box.

Position the legs on the lower second box so they overhang by about 2-1/4″. Secure the lower portion of the legs to the box using glue and 2″ brad nails.

Secure the remaining two legs to the opposite side of the boxes.

Paint or stain the bin as desired. I chose not to paint the inside of the bins.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Fully Assembled

Step Four

Cut two pieces of hardware cloth at 17″ x 21″ (very important – wear gloves!). Cut a square out of each corner so that there won’t be any extra mesh in the corners. I forgot to measure the cuts at the corners but if you hold the mesh over the top of the box, it will be easy to determine what needs to be cut away. Fold the edges of the hardware cloth (approximately 1″ or 4 squares), then fold the sides into a basket-like shape so that the piece will fit inside the bin. Secure the hardware cloth in place with 1/2″ staples. A hammer can be used to flatten the fold at the top of the wire.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Wire Bin

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Inside View of Wire Bin

Install the casters.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Caster

I also added vintage drawer pulls (spray painted white) to the sides and a fabulous graphic from The Graphics Fairy.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Handle Painted

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Handle Installed

Here are the projects from my fellow bloggers:

Chevron Wood Easter Egg by Kim Six Fix

Wooden Swing Shelf by Domestically Speaking

Wooden Easter Eggs by Create And Babble

Repurposed Easter Cross by Prodigal Pieces

Planter Box Centerpiece by Refresh Restyle

Upcycled Drawer Front Planter by Confessions of A Serial DIY’er

Rustic 3 Panel Wall Decor by Designed Decor

Key West DIY Wood Planter Box by H2OBungalow

Baseball Bookends by Virginia Sweet Pea

Chair Back Bird Feeder by Interior Frugalista

Wood Slice Rolling Plant Stand by My Repurposed Life

They always have the most awesome projects!

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Quarter View

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin - Top View

If the bin is constructed entirely out of treated wood, it can be used as a planter… I may make that next! Have any questions about the DIY furniture plans to build a Fruit and Vegetable Bin? Leave a comment below!




Power Tool Challenge – Kris Kringle Edition

DIY Wood Arrow Candleholder

It is time for the Power Tool Challenge again, this time the theme is “Secret Santa”! The idea is that the project will be created then mailed to one of the other bloggers in the group as a surprise. So fun, right? I created a super-easy DIY Wood Arrow Candleholder using a template and my bandsaw, then finished it with a metallic polyurethane. While this candleholder isn’t exactly a “Christmasy” project, it is the perfect quick to make gift for the upcoming holiday season!

DIY Wood Arrow Candleholder

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Materials:

  • Scrap pieces of 2×4
  • Wood glue
  • Clamps
  • Shape template of your choice
  • Bandsaw
  • Sander (I used an oscillating tool with a sander attachment) with sandpaper
  • 1-7/8″ Forstner bit
  • Tealight candle & holder

I glued two 12″ pieces of 2×4 together (face to face) and clamped them until dry. A scrap piece of 4×4 post can also be used, if desired.

DIY Wood Arrow Candleholder-2x4 pieces

I traced the template on one face of the 2x4s.

DIY Wood Arrow Candleholder-Template

Then, I cut out the shape with my bandsaw. A bandsaw is really easy to use and is my favorite power tool! If you’ve never used a bandsaw but want to learn, check out my post on Bandsaw Basics!

DIY Wood Arrow Candleholder-Bandsaw

I used my drill press with a 1-7/8″ Forstner bit to cut the hole for the tealight candle and holder. The Forstner bit is the perfect size for the glass holder. I drill the hole as deep as the bit, which is approximately 1/2″. In all honesty, it doesn’t have to be that deep – just deep enough for the glass holder.

DIY Wood Arrow Candleholder-Forstner Bit

I used an oscillating tool with a sanding head on it to sand the faces of the candleholder. The small shape gets into the tight areas nicely to create a smooth finish.

As a fabulous finish, I applied three coats of a metallic polyurethane, lightly sanding between coats. The metallic polyurethane gives the candleholder just a bit of sparkle!

DIY Wood Arrow Candleholder-Angled View

DIY Wood Arrow Candleholder-Top View

Isn’t it great? I already know who the lucky recipient will be but I can’t say – it would spoil the surprise! Take a look at more Power Tool Challenge inspiration from my fellow bloggers:


Awesome, right? Have any questions about the DIY Wood Arrow Candleholder for the Power Tool Challenge? Leave a comment below!




Unique Bookends That Are Easy to Make

Cityscape Bookends for the Power Tool Challenge

During the first Power Tool Challenge, I got together with fellow bloggers to create a project using one power tool – a drill. I made a wall mounted light fixture that was really easy and looks fabulous! After taking the summer off, we are back with a new project, this time using a jigsaw. I chose to make Cityscape Bookends for the Power Tool Challenge complete with full-scale templates. The “buildings” use only straight cuts making this the perfect project for those new to the jigsaw!

Cityscape Bookends for the Power Tool Challenge_Featured

Graphic

Tools & Materials:

  • 1 – 1×3 at 4′
  • 1 – 1×6 at 4′
  • Printer & paper
  • Spray adhesive
  • Sandpaper (80 grit, 120, grit, 220 grit)
  • Jigsaw with a scrolling blade
  • Drill with a Phillips bit, and a countersink bit
  • Pocket hole jig, optional
  • 8 – 1-1/2″ screws
  • Wood glue
  • Paint (I used spray paint)
  • Adhesive felt pads

Cut List:

  • 1 – 1×6 at 12″ – Building 1
  • 1 – 1×6 at 12″ – Building 2
  • 2 – 1×3 at 6″ – Bookend Bottom
  • 2 – 1×3 at 10-3/4″ – Bookend Side

Step One

Cut pieces of the 1×6 to length using the jigsaw. Print the templates and align the registration marks on the taller building then tape the sheets together. Cut out the buildings. Spray the back side of the paper templates with the spray adhesive, then position the templates on the 1×6 pieces.

Cityscape Bookends for the Power Tool Challenge_Templates

Step Two

Cut out the buildings using a jigsaw and a scrolling blade. The scrolling blade is narrower, and is generally used for cutting curves. To me, I get better control of the jigsaw by using a scrolling blade for projects like this.

Make the horizontal cuts first stopping just short of the template, then make the vertical cuts. (Ignore my not-very-straight cuts!)

Cityscape Bookends for the Power Tool Challenge_Cuts

Step Three

Peel as much of the template off as possible. If there is any paper left, it can be sanded off.  Thoroughly sand the edges and the faces of the buildings, starting with the 80 grit sandpaper, moving to the 120 grit, then finishing with 220 grit.

Step Four

Cut the 1×3 pieces with the jigsaw and sand the pieces thoroughly. With the pocket hole jig set for 3/4″ material, drill pocket holes in one end of the shorter boards.

Draw a line down the length of the shorter boards in the middle of the pieces (on the bottom face). Drill two holes along this line approximately 1″ from the center of the line.

Secure the longer boards to the end of the shorter boards using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

If you do not have a pocket hole jig, countersunk 1-1/2″ screws can be used to secure the pieces to each other. Draw a line 3/4″ up from the bottom edge of the longer boards, and drill two countersunk holes between the line and the end of the board. Secure the longer board to the shorter board using glue and 1-1/2″ screws.

Secure the buildings to each of the shorter pieces using glue and 1-1/2″ screws through the bottom.

Cityscape Bookends for the Power Tool Challenge_Bottom

Cityscape Bookends for the Power Tool Challenge_Unfinished

Step Five

Finish the bookends as desired. I used three coats of a flat white spray paint, with a light sanding in between each coat. Add the adhesive felt pads to the bottom.

Cityscape Bookends for the Power Tool Challenge_Finished

Cityscape Bookends for the Power Tool Challenge_with Book

Take a look at some of the other projects for the Power Tool Challenge:



Great inspiration, right? There are all kinds of great projects including these Cityscape Bookends for the Power Tool Challenge! They are great for a college dorm, a kid’s desk, or even a home office! Have any questions? Leave a comment below!