How to Make a Framed Cork Board with Wine Bottle Corks

I made this board for Mr. Awesome for our anniversary representing some of the bottles of wine we’d shared over the past year. I thought I had enough corks but apparently not… This is still a work in progress!

Most wine bottle corks are no longer “cork”, they are rubber which works even better for this project since they are easier to cut!

Materials:

  • Wine bottle corks
  • Box cutter with a new blade
  • Frame with a wood back
  • Stain or paint for the frame
  • Hot glue gun and glue sticks

Let’s get started!

An existing frame can be used or a new one can be built. I used a frame from a cabinet door that I never finished. I routed a rabbet on the back side and glued a piece of 1/4″ lauan in the opening. I stained the frame then sealed it with polyurethane. I added a sawtooth hanger on the top and on the side so it could be hung vertically or horizontally, then added an antique-looking knob in the corner.

   

 Cut the corks in half. The rubber corks are very easy to cut but be careful!

    

Start gluing the corks  in place. Some of the corks are longer than others and small pieces will have to be trimmed to fit in the spaces but this adds to the rustic look I was trying to achieve!

    

If I hadn’t used such a large frame, this would not continue to be a work in progress! So I guess it may be a few more months before it is finally finished… Maybe for our next anniversary??

Until next time,

Happy Creating!

Tip Junkie handmade projects

 




A Mounted Faux Deer Head Gets a New Backdrop

Build a Framed Brick Panel

I’m still in the midst of finishing my daughter’s “new” bedroom (big brother’s old room) and decided that her faux deer head, Felipe Hornsworth the First needed a makeover so he wouldn’t get lost on the wall (see how I made Felipe here). With a few scraps left from the remodel, I chose to build a framed brick panel to use as a back drop for Felipe. this frame is built exactly like the framed dorm mirror but sized to fit a piece of the leftover brick paneling.

build-a-framed-brick-panel

build-a-framed-brick-panel-angled-view

Materials:

  • Wood Glue
  • Fast-drying adhesive such as DAP® Rapid Fuse
  • 1/2″ screws
  • Sandpaper (100, 150, 220 grits)
  • Finishing supplies (primer & paint, or stain, sealer)

Tools Needed:

  • Miter saw
  • Circular Saw or Jigsaw
  • Drill
  • Sander

Lumber:

  • Scrap 1x4s
  • 3/4″ square dowel rods
  • 1″ square dowel rods
  • Scrap piece of MDF brick paneling

Notes about the project:

There is no cut list for the lumber because you will determine the size of the frame you want. The scrap piece of brick paneling I used measured 14-1/4″ x 22-1/2″ and I built the frame around it.

Instead of using square dowels, I ripped the trim pieces from a scrap 1×4. Only do this if you are comfortable cutting narrow pieces on a table saw.

The plans for the dorm mirror frame can be found here.

Step One

Determine the size of the center panel. Cut two pieces of 1×4 the same height as the panel and two pieces of 1×4 at the same length plus 7″ (3-1/2″ for each 1×4). Assemble the base frame according to the plans.

build-a-framed-brick-panel-base

Step Two

Cut the pieces of 3/4″ square dowels to fit the inner part of the frame. I used mitered corners. The pieces can be butted against each other, as well. The pieces will extend 1/4″ past the front face of the frame leaving a 1/4″ inset on the back. This will allow the center panel to fit flush with the frame.

build-a-framed-brick-panel-inner-trim

Step Three

Cut the pieces for the outer edge of the frame from the 1″ square dowels. The back face of the dowel trim will fit along the outside edges of the frame and will be flush with the back face of the frame.

build-a-framed-brick-panel-outer-trim

Step Four

Finish the frame as desired. I used a dark brown stain with two coats of a satin polyurethane.

Position the panel in the center of the frame on the inset created by the 3/4″ trim. Secure the panel in place using 1/2″ screws.

build-a-framed-brick-panel-plain

I drove a brad nail through the center panel then hung Felipe on the nail. any type of artwork would be fabulous in the frame – a canvas, a wood sign or even a smaller frame with a sentimental photo. (The plans for the bed can be found here!)

build-a-framed-brick-panel-completed

Have any questions about how to build a framed brick panel? Leave a comment below!




DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Simple Mirror Frame

An Easy to Build Frame For an Inexpensive Mirror

My daughter has one of the inexpensive $5 mirrors in her room (I call them “dorm mirrors”). Every time I walked by her room and saw that mirror, I would remind myself to build a new frame for it so it didn’t look so cheap! Since we are remodeling Big Brother’s room for her to move into, I figured it would be the perfect time to build the frame. The DIY furniture plans to build a simple mirror frame are just that – simple! The frame has a 1×4 base with a trim profile along the inside and outside edges. The mirror fits inside the inner opening, and a 1/4″ piece of plywood keeps the mirror in place. I knocked this frame out in about two days plus, it matches the letter jewelry hanger I made for her room!

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Simple Mirror Frame - Completed View

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Simple Mirror Frame - Close Up Corner

Materials:

  • 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws
  • Fast-drying adhesive
  • Wood glue
  • Sandpaper (100, 150, 220 grits)
  • Finishing supplies (primer & paint, or stain, sealer)

Tools needed:

  • Miter saw or circular saw
  • Table saw, optional
  • Drill
  • Pocket hole jig

Lumber:

  • 4 – 1×4 at 6′ OR
  • 2 – 1×4 at 6′
  • 3 – 1″ square dowels
  • 3 – 3/4″ square dowels
  • 1 – 2′ x 4′ sheet of 1/4″ plywood

Cut List:

  • 2 – 1×4 at 19″ – Frame Base
  • 2 – 1×4 at 47-3/4″ – Frame Base
  • 2 – 3/4″ square pieces at 12″ – Inner Trim
  • 2 – 3/4″ square pieces at 47-3/4″ – Inner Trim
  • 2 – 3/4″ x 1″ pieces at 20-1/2″ – Outer Trim
  • 2 – 3/4″ x 1″ pieces at 56-1/4″ – Outer Trim
  • (If using 1″ square dowels, they will be cut to the same length as the 3/4″ x 1″ pieces.)
  • 1 – 1/4″ plywood at 12″ x 47-3/4″ – Back

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Simple Mirror Frame

Click on the drawings for a larger view!

Notes about the project:

I ripped the trim pieces from a 1×4. If you are not comfortable enough to safely rip pieces this narrow on a table saw, use square dowels instead. Most home improvement stores sell them in 3′ or 4′ lengths.

The mirror I used measured 12″ x 47-3/4″ without the frame. Measure the mirror you are using before cutting any of the pieces and adjust the plan accordingly.

Step One

Cut the pieces for the frame base. With the pocket hole jig set for 3/4″ material, drill pocket holes in each end of the longer pieces. Assemble the frame using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Simple Mirror Frame -frame-base

Step Two

Cut the pieces for the inner trim (3/4″ square). Each piece will have a 45° miter at each end. Make marks on the inside edge of the frame 1/4″ from the back. This will allow the trim to create a 1/4″ inset on the back of the frame and maintain a 1/4″ profile on the front. Secure the trim pieces along the inner edge of the frame base using a fast-drying adhesive and clamp in place until dry.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Simple Mirror Frame -inner-trim

Step Three

Cut the pieces for the outer trim (3/4″ x 1″ OR 1″ square dowels). Each piece will have a 45° miter at each end. Secure the trim pieces along the outer edge of the frame base using a fast-drying adhesive and clamp in place until dry.

Finish the frame as desired. I used a coat of stain in Kona and finished with two coats of satin polyurethane.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Simple Mirror Frame -outer-trim

Step Four

Insert the mirror in the inset on the back of the frame. Cut the 1/4″ plywood to fit, then secure in place using washers and screws (I used soda can tabs – see photo!) or duct tape.

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Simple Mirror Frame -back

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Simple Mirror Frame - soda-can-tab

Add a hanger to the back of the frame if desired. My daughter’s mirror will just lean against the wall.

Have any questions about the DIY furniture plans to build a simple mirror frame? Leave a comment below – I’m here to help!




An Easy to Build Frame for an Inexpensive Mirror

DIY Plans to Build a Dorm Mirror Frame

Dorm mirrors (the mirror with cheap plastic frames that can be purchased for $5.99) don’t have to look cheap… A beautiful frame can be built for these mirrors that will give it lots of style! The DIY plans to build a Dorm Mirror Frame are really simple using straight off the shelf boards, and can be finished to fit any decor. This is a great plan for those new to woodworking!

DIY Plans to Build a Dorm Mirror Frame_Copy

Materials:

  • 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws
  • 3/4″ screws
  • 1″ brad nails
  • Dorm mirror with plastic frame (at least 48″ tall)
  • D-Style tabs and picture hanging wire
  • Wood glue
  • Sandpaper (100, 150, 220 grits)
  • Finishing supplies (primer & paint, or stain, sealer)

Lumber:

  • 1 – scrap of 1×3, at least 12″
  • 1 – scrap of 1×6, at least 12″
  • 1 – 4′ x 8′ sheet of 1/4″ plywood

Cut List:

  • 2 – 1×3 at 52-1/2″ – Frame Sides
  • 1 – 1×3 at 11″ – Frame Bottom
  • 1 – 1×6 at 11″ – Frame Top
  • 2 – 1/4″ plywood at 1″ x 14″ – Back Frame
  • 2 – 1/4″ plywood at 1″ x 48″ – Back Frame
  • 1 – 1/4″ plywood at 14″ x 50″ – Back

DIY Plans to Build a Dorm Mirror Frame

Click on the drawings for a larger view!

Step One

Cut the pieces for the frame. Draw the arc on the 1×6 piece in any way chosen, maintaining the overall dimensions. Cut the curve using a bandsaw or a jigsaw.

With the pocket hole jig set for 3/4″ material, drill pocket holes in each end of the 1×6 piece and the 1×3 piece. Assemble the frame using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

DIY Plans to Build a Dorm Mirror Frame_Frame

Step Two

Cut the pieces for the back frame. These strips will keep the mirror in place so that the back can be positioned and secured. Secure the strips to the back of the frame using glue and 3/4″ screws. There will be a 1/2″ border around the inside of the frame leaving about a 1″ border around the outside of the frame.

Finish the frame as desired.

DIY Plans to Build a Dorm Mirror Frame_Back Frame

Step Three

Position the mirror inside the back frame so it rests on the back face of the larger frame. Secure the back piece to the back frame using 1″ brad nails through the back.

Install the d-style tabs, then secure the picture framing wire through the loops. Hang as desired.

DIY Plans to Build a Dorm Mirror Frame_Mirror

DIY Plans to Build a Dorm Mirror Frame_Back

The mirror panel can also be replaced with a dry erase board or chalkboard, and would look fabulous in any finish! Have any questions about the DIY plans to build a Dorm Mirror Frame? Leave a comment below!




Large Swirly Frames

How to Make a Large Swirly Frame

I saw these huge swirly frames in the local craft store. The wheels were turning and I had all sorts of ideas on how I could use them… until I checked the price! $79.99 was way more than I was willing to pay and even at half off (which is usually what they are advertised at) was still a little steep for me. I figured I could make my own for a fraction of the price and today I’ll show you how to make a large swirly frame!

how to make a large swirly frame SANY2121 copy

Materials:

  • 1 – 2′ x 4′ sheet of 1/2″ MDF (will yield two large frames and two small frames)
  • Pattern for frame
  • Jigsaw (a bandsaw works really well for this project, also!)
  • Drill with a 1/2″ bit (or large enough to make a hole for the jigsaw blade to fit into)
  • Router with a decorative bit and a rabbeting bit

I bought a 4′ x 8′ sheet of MDF for $20 and had it cut down to 2′ x 4′ pieces. It is much more economical that way (for me, anyway) plus, I have plenty of material left over to make more frames.

Start by drawing out your frame. I used my Silhouette Cameo program to enlarge a curvy gift tag, then cut it out with brown kraft paper. You can also draw the basic rectangle for the frame, then add the “swirls” to the outside.

how to make a large swirly frame 2039

Trace the design on the MDF.

how to make a large swirly frame 2040

I used a 1×3 board (lined up with the outside edge of the curves) to draw the inner part of the frame that will be cut out but decided it was too small, so I used a 1×4 instead.

how to make a large swirly frame 2041

how to make a large swirly frame 2042

 I used the drill with a 1/2″ drill bit to drill holes just inside each corner of the inner part of the frame so I could cut it out with my jigsaw. I used the material that was cut out of the center of the frame to make a smaller frame using the same methods – I didn’t want to waste any material!!

how to make a large swirly frame 2043

I used the bandsaw to cut out the curvy part of the frame (because the jigsaw and I do not agree on anything most times!). I used the router to cut a rabbet on the inside of the frame for glass or whatever I decide to put in there, then used the decorative bit to rout the outside edge of the frame.

how to make a large swirly frame 2049

how to make a large swirly frame 2050

 I painted them Mark Twain Gray Brick by Valspar… Kinda looks like chalkboard paint, doesn’t it?

how to make a large swirly frame 2122

how to make a large swirly frame 2123

I really love this tutorial on how to make a large swirly frame but I haven’t yet decided how I’d like to use the frames – photos, jewelry organization, magnet board, chalkboard, etc., or maybe just hang as is… What do you think? 

Got a project you’ve completed using my plans? Share photos with me at cher {at} designsbystudioc {dot} com or designsbystudioc {at} gmail {dot} com. I would love to feature your work on DbSC!

Sharing with My Repurposed Life, The Real Thing with the Coake Family




Another Frame Built from the Scrap Pile…

My daughter painted the sweetest picture for me in her art class. I love the bright colors and her fun approach to a vase with flowers! I decided to build another frame using pieces from the scrap pile to showcase her artwork!

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Materials:

  • Scrap 1x3s
  • Scrap 1x6s
  • Decorative Wood Embellishment
  • Glass
  • Kreg Jig, Screws, and Clamp
  • Router with Flush Cutting Bit
  • Sander and Sandpaper
  • Stain or Paint

The picture was painted on 12″ x 18″ paper.

SANY0805

I cut one of the pieces of 1×3 at 11-1/4″, and two at 25-1/4″. I cut the piece of 1×6 at 11-1/4″ to serve as the bottom of the frame and backdrop for the decorative wood piece.

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I assembled the frame with glue and the pocket hole screws…

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…then cut a 3/8″ rabbet on the inside of the frame to allow for the glass.

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I used a hammer and chisel to square the corners of the rabbet… (Note that I am not the best at this!!)

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I decided to use one of those decorative wood cutouts on the front…

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After a thorough sanding (using 80 grit, 120 grit, then 220 grit) I stained the frame and decorative piece with Rust-Oleum’s Ultimate Wood Stain in Kona.

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Once it was dry, I added two coats of Rust-Oleum’s Ultimate Wood Stain in Sunbleached.

 

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After the stain was fully dry, I glued the decorative piece on the front and added three coats of Rust-Oleum’s Ultimate Polyurethane in Satin.

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I cut the glass to size using my trusty glass cutter…

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…and cut a piece of corrugated board for the back.

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I inserted the glass, the picture, and the corrugated board into the frame and secured it with a framing tab gun. I added a sawtooth hanger to the back…

SANY0806

…and am ready to hang my new artwork on the wall!

 

 

 




Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile…

Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile

As I was poking around in my scrap pile the other day, I came across a few good pieces of oak. Since I built the frames for mirrors and a cork board, why not build a couple of picture frames, too?

Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile SANY0578 copy

Materials & Supplies:

  • Scraps of wood
  • Kreg Pocket Hole Jig & Screws
  • Drill
  • Wood Glue
  • Router & Rabbeting Bit
  • Hammer & Chisel
  • Sander & Sandpaper
  • Glass & Cutter
  • Framing Tab Gun (go here)
  • Finishing Supplies

Let’s Get Started!

Determine the height and width of your frame.  I decided to use up the entire length of the scraps so my frames measure 10-1/4″ x 13-1/2″ and 15-1/4″ square overall with the glass measuring 8″ x 9″ for one and 8-3/4″ x 10-3/4″ for the other. The photo sizes will be odd but I can always crop the photos to fit!

Drill two pocket holes in each end of the shorter boards but remember to leave room for the rabbet so the router bit doesn’t hit the screws! Assemble using glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile 2

Cut the rabbet with the router and chisel the corners square. (Here is a link showing basic chiseling – even though it is about robots – go here)

Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile 3

Sand thoroughly starting with 80 grit sandpaper, to 120 grit, then to 220 grit. Stain and finish as desired. I used my favorite Rust-Oleum Ultimate Wood Stain in Sunbleached and Ultimate Polyurethane in Matte.

Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile 4

Most home improvement stores have a glass-cutting area and can cut the glass to the size needed. I cut the glass myself. It is very easy to do and a glass cutter can be purchased at any home improvement or hobby store. If you cut the glass yourself, please do it cautiously! Safety glasses and gloves are a must!!

Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile 5

To cut the glass, I used my clear quilting rulers to “mark” the line. Score the glass with the cutter ONCE (do not go back over it). Move the glass to the edge of your work table (with the score line just over the edge) and snap the glass downward. It should break in a nice, clean line.

Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile 6

To cut a small amount off, use pliers to break that portion. It should break in a clean line, as well.

Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile 7

Layer the glass, the picture, and a thin piece of cardboard in the frame and use the Framing Tab Gun to secure them in place. Add a sawtooth hanger to the back for hanging…

Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile 8

There you are! These frames cost virtually nothing but time! Aren’t they great?

Build Picture Frames from the Scrap Pile 9

#DIY #woodworking #build




Build a Framed Corkboard for Display

My boyfriend wanted a cool place to display pictures of places we’ve hiked. He’s not a “fancy picture frame” type of guy and suggested a large cork board with a wood frame. What a great idea! I got to work drawing plans and building him an awesome display piece for his wall…

Tools:

  • Kreg jig & 1-1/4” pocket hole screws
  • Drill
  • Saw – Circular, Jig or Miter
  • Router with a 3/8” rabbeting bit
  • Glue

Materials:

  • 2 – 1×4 at 6′
  • Large Corkboard
  • Sawtooth picture hangers
  • Finishing supplies of your choice

Let’s get started!

The length of the corkboard is 36″. I cut two pieces of the 1×4 at 42-1/4″ which is the length of the corkboard plus 7” (the width of the lumber times two) minus 3/4” (3/8” rabbet times two). If it is slightly bigger, no problem! It is OK to have a little wiggle room anyway! I cut two more pieces of the 1×4 at 15-1/4″ with the math being a little different. These pieces are the width of the corkboard minus 3/4” (3/8” rabbet times two) only.

Set your Kreg jig for 3/4” material and drill two pocket holes in each end of the shorter boards. Place the holes at least 1” from the inside of the frame to allow for the rabbet, you don’t want the router to hit the screws! Make sure the frame is square and assemble with glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Using the router and the rabbeting bit, set the depth to the thickness of the bit. If the corkboard is a little thicker, you will have to make two passes. In other words, if the bit is 3/8” deep and your corkboard is 1/2”, you will have to make one pass with the router bit set at 3/8” deep, and another pass at with it set at 1/2” deep. My corkboard is 3/8″ thick. I will make one pass with the router and glue it in place.

Finish the frame first before adding the corkboard. I stained it with Rust-Oleum Ultimate Wood Stain in Sunbleached, then sealed it with Rust-Oleum Ultimate Polyurethane in Matte.

The corners of your frame can be squared with a chisel or the corners of the corkboard can be cut off.  Glue it in place.

Once the glue is dry, add the sawtooth hangers to the back. Hang it and now you have a great place to display your pictures!

Until next time,

Happy Creating!

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P.S. Remember the post about the Framed Mirror? I took the other half of the mirror and created a shorter version. What do you think?




Build a Framed Mirror

I had an old mirror that fell off the wall and broke in half. Does that still count as seven years of bad luck? (My thinking is no, since it broke in two pieces and didn’t shatter!) Anyway, rather than let it go to waste, I thought I’d cut the pieces down and build a frame to go around each of them! This is another project that is totally customizable and is a great way to use up your scraps of lumber!

Materials:

  • 1- 1×2 at 8′ ( I used oak because I had this piece in my scrap pile)
  • 1 – 1×3 at 4′
  • Kreg jig and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws
  • Router and 3/8″ rabbeting bit
  • Hammer and chisel
  • Wood glue
  • Sander and sandpaper (80 grit, 120 grit, and 220 grit)
  • Wood stain and sealer; or paint and sealer
  • Sawtooth hanger
  • Adhesive or picture frame tab gun

Let’s get started!

My mirror measures 12″ x 29″. The frame pieces will have to be cut to allow for the mirror and to subtract for the rabbet which is the groove that the mirror lays in. The  sides of the frame (also known as “stiles”)  were cut to 32-1/4″ which is 33″ – 3/4″ for the rabbets. The top and bottom of the frame (also known as “rails”) were cut to 11-1/4″ which is the overall width of the mirror minus 3/4″ for the rabbets.

Tools & Supplies

Drill pocket holes in the ends of the shorter boards. make sure they are closer to one side than the other to allow for the rabbet.

Pocket Holes

Assemble the frame with glue and 1-1/4″ pocket hole screws.

Frame Assembled

Using the router, cut a rabbet around the inside opening on the back of the frame. Use the hammer and chisel to square the corners of the frame.

Fill all holes and finish the frame as desired. To get the smoothest finish possible, start sanding with 80 grit sandpaper and gradually work down to 220 grit. If staining, stain then seal with polyurethane. If painting, prime the frame with a primer such as Kilz 2 or Bullseye, then sand with 220 grit sandpaper when dry. Paint, as desired and seal the paint with water-based polyurethane which will not turn yellow. (I like Rust-Oleum Soft Touch Ultimate Polyurethane in Matte)

Stained with Rust-Oleum Ultimate Wood Stain in Sunbleached

Attach the mirror with adhesive or the framing tab gun. Add a sawtooth hanger to the back.

Stand back and admire a job well done! Comment or email me at designsbystudioc@gmail.com if you have any questions!

Until next time,

Happy Creating!

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